1.Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:

What can be the use of a poetry that has no true subject except the poet’s own selfhood? The traditional use of poetry in the Western world has been instruction through delight, where teaching has meant the common truths or common deceptions of societal tradition, and where esthetic pleasure has meant a fulfillment of expectations founded upon past joys of the same design.

 But an individual psyche has its own accidents, which it needs to call truths, and its own necessity for self‐recognition, which requires the pleasures of originality, even if those pleasures depend upon a kind of lying against time, and against the achievements of the past. The use of such poetry demands to be seen in a de idealized way, if it is to be seen more truly.

                                                                                 ‐ Harold Bloom, “The Use of Poetry”

 In the context of the above which is closest to being true?

  1. There can be no use of poetry
  2. Poetry can have no true subject.
  3. Man may be the true subject of poetry
  4. The poet himself may be the subject.

ans: There can be no use of poetry.

2. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:

What can be the use of a poetry that has no true subject except the poet’s own selfhood? The traditional use of poetry in the Western world has been instruction through delight, where teaching has meant the common truths or common deceptions of societal tradition, and where esthetic pleasure has meant a fulfillment of expectations founded upon past joys of the same design.

 But an individual psyche has its own accidents, which it needs to call truths, and its own necessity for self‐recognition, which requires the pleasures of originality, even if those pleasures depend upon a kind of lying against time, and against the achievements of the past. The use of such poetry demands to be seen in a deidealized way, if it is to be seen more truly.

                                                                                 ‐ Harold Bloom, “The Use of Poetry”

What is meant by ‘traditional use of poetry’?

a. Promoting serious ideas

b. Promoting doubtful pleasure

c.Promoting joyous expectations

d. Promoting social honesty in life

ans: Promoting serious ideas

3. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:

What can be the use of a poetry that has no true subject except the poet’s own selfhood? The traditional use of poetry in the Western world has been instruction through delight, where teaching has meant the common truths or common deceptions of societal tradition, and where esthetic pleasure has meant a fulfillment of expectations founded upon past joys of the same design.

 But an individual psyche has its own accidents, which it needs to call truths, and its own necessity for self‐recognition, which requires the pleasures of originality, even if those pleasures depend upon a kind of lying against time, and against the achievements of the past. The use of such poetry demands to be seen in a deidealized way, if it is to be seen more truly.

                                                                                 ‐ Harold Bloom, “The Use of Poetry”

If ‘selfhood’ of a poet is the subject of poetry, then ‘originality’ shall spring from:

  1. some truth of untruths
  2. truth of self‐recognition.
  3. creating ideal pleasures
  4. re‐living the past joys

ans: some truth of untruths

4.Read the following poem and answer the questions that follow:

No worst, there is none.

No worst, there is none. Pitched past pitch of grief,

More pangs will, schooled at forepangs, wilder wring.

Comforter, where, where is your comforting?

Mary, mother of us, where is your relief?

My cries heave, herds‐long; huddle in a main, a chief

Woe, wórld‐sorrow; on an áge‐old anvil wince and sing—

Then lull, then leave off. Fury had shrieked ‘No lingering!

Let me be fell: force I must be brief.

“‘ O the mind, mind has mountains;

cliffs of fall Frightful, sheer, no‐man‐fathomed.

Hold them cheap May who ne’er hung there.

Nor does long our small Durance deal with that steep or deep.

Here! creep, Wretch, under a comfort serves in a whirlwind:

all Life death does end and each day dies with sleep.

‐ Gerard Manley Hopkins

Which of the following best describes the meaning of the title of the poem, ‘No worst, there is none.’

  1. It is not worst because there is nothing.
  2. Nothing can be so much bad as this
  3. No it is worst as nothing is there.
  4. It is very bad as no one is there

Answer :‐ It is not worst because there is nothing.

5,Read the following poem and answer the questions that follow:

No worst, there is none.

No worst, there is none. Pitched past pitch of grief,

More pangs will, schooled at forepangs, wilder wring.

Comforter, where, where is your comforting?

Mary, mother of us, where is your relief?

My cries heave, herds‐long; huddle in a main, a chief

Woe, wórld‐sorrow; on an áge‐old anvil wince and sing—

Then lull, then leave off. Fury had shrieked ‘No lingering!

Let me be fell: force I must be brief.

“‘ O the mind, mind has mountains;

cliffs of fall Frightful, sheer, no‐man‐fathomed.

Hold them cheap May who ne’er hung there.

Nor does long our small Durance deal with that steep or deep.

Here! creep, Wretch, under a comfort serves in a whirlwind:

all Life death does end and each day dies with sleep.

‐ Gerard Manley Hopkins

Beyond the intensity of known grief, there can be:

  1. no grief than being experienced.
  2. only a new pain more painful.
  3. only the twisted known pains.
  4. the griefs beyond limits of pain.

Answer :‐ no grief than being experienced.

6. Read the following poem and answer the questions that follow:

No worst, there is none.

No worst, there is none. Pitched past pitch of grief,

More pangs will, schooled at forepangs, wilder wring.

 Comforter, where, where is your comforting?

Mary, mother of us, where is your relief?

 My cries heave, herds‐long; huddle in a main, a chief

Woe, wórld‐sorrow; on an áge‐old anvil wince and sing—

Then lull, then leave off. Fury had shrieked ‘No lingering!

Let me be fell: force I must be brief.

“‘ O the mind, mind has mountains;

cliffs of fall Frightful, sheer, no‐man‐fathomed.

 Hold them cheap May who ne’er hung there.

 Nor does long our small Durance deal with that steep or deep.

Here! creep, Wretch, under a comfort serves in a whirlwind:

all Life death does end and each day dies with sleep.

                                                        ‐ Gerard Manley Hopkins

Which two of the following are true?

  1. Not all know the intensity or depth of suffering.
  2. Death does not put an end to our sufferings.
  3. Suffering is seen as winds that hinder comfort
  4. Suffering’s intensity or depth is in the mind.

Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and B only
  2. C and D only
  3. A and D only
  4. B and D only

Answer :‐ A and B only  

7. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow:

‘Justice’ was done, and the President of the Immortals , in Aeschylean phrase, had ended his sport with Tess. And the D’Urberville knights and dames slept on in their tombs unknowing. The two speechless gazers bent themselves down to the earth, as if in prayer, and remained thus a long time, absolutely motionless; the flag continued to wave silently. As soon as they had enough strength they arose, joined hands again, and went on.                                                                                                 ‐‐Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles

How did the ‘sport with Tess’ end?

 1. She was hanged.

 2. She was expelled from Wintoncester.

3. The tormentor married her.

4. She died an untimely death.

Answer: . She was hanged.

8. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow:

‘Justice’ was done, and the President of the Immortals , in Aeschylean phrase, had ended his sport with Tess. And the D’Urberville knights and dames slept on in their tombs unknowing. The two speechless gazers bent themselves down to the earth, as if in prayer, and remained thus a long time, absolutely motionless; the flag continued to wave silently. As soon as they had enough strength they arose, joined hands again, and went on.                                                                                                 ‐‐Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Who are the ‘two speechless gazers’?

 1. Reverend James Clare and Mrs. Brooks

 2. ‘Liza‐Lu and Angel Clare

 3. Tess’s two parents

 4. Parson Tringham and Mrs. d’Urberville

Answer :‐ Reverend James Clare and Mrs. Brooks.

9. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow: The solemn temples, the great globe itself,

 Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve

 And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,

 Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff

 As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.                                           

                                               ‐‐  Shakespeare, The Tempest

‘‘[T]his insubstantial pageant’ refers to:

 1. the shutdown of Globe theatre.

 2. a non‐real performance.

 3. the destroyed mother earth.

 4. enactment with support structure.

 Answer :‐ the shutdown of Globe theatre.

10. Read the following extract and answer the questions that follow: The solemn temples, the great globe itself,

 Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve

 And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,

 Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff

 As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.                                           

                                               ‐‐  Shakespeare, The Tempest

‘We are such stuff as dreams are made on’ means:

  1. Human life is full of imaginary colours.
  2. Our life is a text of what happened.
  3. We are a bundle of past reality.
  4. There is no substance to human life.
    Answer :‐Human life is full of imaginary colours.

11.In “An Apology for Poetry” Sidney discusses the didactic function of poetry by comparing it to philosophy and

1. religion.

2. aesthetics

 3. history.

 4. ethics.

 Answer :‐ religion.

12. According to Longinus which two of the following qualities apply to ‘great poetry’?
A. It must be the work of genius, an inspired person.
B. It must cause a feeling of melancholy in the reader.
C. It must employ devices of rhetoric.
D. It must please selectively and on special occasions.
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and B only
  2. A and C only
  3. B and D only
  4. C and D only
    Answer :‐
    A and B only

13. In “The Function of Criticism” T.S.Eliot attacked J. Middleton Murry and similar critics for being devotees of what he called:

  1. “the Inner Voice”.
  2. “the Romantic Impulse”.
  3. “the Symbol Hunt”.
  4. “the Muse’s Mystery”.

    Answer :‐
    “the Inner Voice”

14. Who among the following compared ‘the mind in creation’ to ‘a fading coal’?

  1. Wordsworth
  2. Coleridge
  3. Shelley
  4. Keats
    Correct Answer :‐
    Wordsworth

15. Who among the following considered paraphrase as ‘a heresy’?

  1. Percy Lubbock
  2. Edmund Wilson
  3. I.A.Richards
  4. Cleanth Brooks
    Answer :‐
    Percy Lubbock

16, Empiricist linguistics is concerned with :

  1. investigation of the human mind.
  2. directly observable sense‐data.
  3. reason as a determinant of enquiry.
  4. innate language knowledge.

    Answer :‐
    investigation of the human mind.

17. In Noam Chomsky’s definition of grammar which two features are drawn from mathematics ?
A. complexity
B. abstraction
C. transformation
D. generation
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and B only
  2. A and C only
  3. B and D only
  4. C and D only

answer : A and B

17. ‘Potato’ is a sixteenth‐century borrowing into English from:

  1. Spanish.
  2. French.
  3. German.
  4. Norwegian.
    Correct Answer :‐
    Spanish

18. Who among the following represents the global spread of English diagrammatically as three concentric circles?

  1. David Crystal
  2. Jenny Cheshire
  3. Braj B. Kachru
  4. Salikoko Mufwene
    Correct Answer :‐
    David Crystal

19. Who among the following is the founder of the Survey of English Usage (SEU)?

  1. Randolph Quirk
  2. Henry Watson Fowler
  3. Michael Swan
  4. Bryan Garner

    Correct Answer :‐
    Randolph Quirk

20. Who is the author of the short story, “Beethoven Was One‐Sixteenth Black”?

  1. J. M. Coetzee
  2. Nadine Gordimer
  3. Andre Brink
  4. Bessie Head

    Correct Answer :‐
    J. M. Coetzee

21. Arrange the following texts in the chronological order of publication.
A. This Bridge Called My Back
B. Sexual Politics
C. Gender Trouble
D. The Feminine Mystique
Choose the correct answer from the options given below

  1. B, D, A, C
  2. D, B, A, C
  3. D, A, B, C
  4. B, D, C, A
    Correct Answer :‐
    B, D, A, C

22. Who is the author of the essay “Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool”?

  1. Aldous Huxley
  2. George Orwell
  3. Virginia Woolf
  4. Somerset Maugham
    Correct Answer :‐
    Aldous Huxley

23.Who is the author of the essay “Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool”?

  1. Aldous Huxley
  2. George Orwell
  3. Virginia Woolf
  4. Somerset Maugham
    Correct Answer :‐
    Aldous Huxley

24. Which of the following poems by Robert Browning contains the lines, “Our interest’s on the dangerous edge of things. /
The honest thief, the tender murderer, / The superstitious atheist. . .”?

  1. “A Death in the Desert”
  2. “Count Gismond”
  3. “Bishop Blougram’s Apology”
  4. “Love Among the Ruins”

    Answer :‐
    “A Death in the Desert”

25. Who among the following edited The Cornhill Magazine?

  1. Charles Dickens
  2. Lewis Carroll
  3. William Makepeace Thackeray
  4. Anthony Trollope
    Answer :‐
    Charles Dickens

26. Which of the following novels has its epigraph taken from the Katha Upanishad?

  1. The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells
  2. The Razor’s Edge by Somerset Maugham
  3. Point Counter Point by Aldous Huxley
  4. A Room with a View by E. M. Forster
    Answer :‐
    The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells

27. Who is the author of the essay, “What Isn’t Literature?”?

  1. E. D. Hirsch Jr.
  2. Paul Ricoeur
  3. Hans‐Georg Gadamer
  4. Terry Eagleton
    Answer :‐
    E. D. Hirsch Jr

28. Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis (1946) ends with a chapter on:

  1. Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse.
  2. Wyndham Lewis’s The Apes of God.
  3. James Joyce’s Ulysses.
  4. George Eliot’s Middlemarch.
    Answer :‐
    Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse.

29. Which of the following clusters is associated with what Julia Kristeva terms the ‘semiotic’?

  1. Authority, order and patriarchy
  2. Displacement, slippage and condensation
  3. Repression, control and normalcy
  4. Logic, reason and power
    Answer :‐
    Authority, order and patriarchy

30.Which two works in the following list are written by Aphra Behn?
A. Rover
B. Oroonoko
C. Soldier’s Fortune
D. The Princess of Cleve
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and B only
  2. B and C only
  3. B and D only
  4. A and C only

    Correct Answer :‐
    A and B only

31. Which two of the following are works by Gustave Flaubert?
A. The Temptation of Saint Anthony
B. Old Goriot
C. Therese Raquin
D. Sentimental Education
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and C only
  2. B and C only
  3. A and D only
  4. B and D only

    Answer :‐
    A and C only

32. Which two of the following conform to liberal humanist thought?
A. Literature transcends the limits of the age of its origin and so is timeless.
B. Literature is untouched by the essential human nature which is unchanging.
C. Literature is devoid of any purpose to enhance life or promote human values.
D. Identity is a unique essence unaffected by environment and society.
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and C only
  2. B and C only
  3. A and D only
  4. B and D only

answer: A and C only

33.Which two of the following conform to Northrop Frye’s typology of literature?
A. Mythos of spring: Comedy
B. Mythos of summer: Satire
C. Mythos of autumn: Tragedy

D. Mythos of winter: Romance
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and C only
  2. B and C only
  3. A and b only
  4. B and D only

answer: a and b only

34. Which two of the following writers does A. D. Hope address through his poetic responses in A Book of Answers?
A. Tolstoy
B. Dostoevsky
C. Mallarme
D. Goethe
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and C only
  2. B and C only
  3. A and D only
  4. B and D only

Answer: A and D only

35. Which two of the following are true according to the documentation style prescribed by the eighth edition of the MLA
Handbook?
A. If the title page of a book contains an imprint as well as the publisher’s name, omit the imprint and use the publisher’s
name.
B. While giving a URL copy it from the Web browser but omit http:// or https://.
C. If a quotation extends to more than five lines set it off from the text as block indented an inch from the left margin.
D. Long titles should be abbreviated using the first letter of key words typed in upper case without intervening space.
Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

  1. A and C only
  2. B and C only
  3. A and B only
  4. B and D only

Answer: A and B only

36. What was poor Yorick in Hamlet?

  1. Jester
  2. Actor
  3. Soldier
  4. Gravedigger

    Correct Answer :‐
    Jester

37. Which of the following words refers to a sound that is associated with a particular meaning?

  1. phoneme
  2. phonic substance
  3. phonestheme
  4. phonemoid

    Correct Answer :‐
    phoneme

38. Who among the following Dickens characters appears as a ghost?

  1. Daniel Quilp
  2. Dora Spenlow
  3. Esther Summerson
  4. Jacob Marley
    Correct Answer :‐
    Daniel Quilp

39. Virginia Woolf’s Orlando opens in 1588 and Orlando, a sixteen‐year‐old boy, writes a poem called:

  1. “The Evergreen Tree”.
  2. “The Poison Tree”.
  3. “The Oak Tree”.
  4. “The Magic Tree”.
    Correct Answer :‐
    “The Evergreen Tree”